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For Genealogists

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There is quite a bit of Information for genealogists on this site - it is best accessed using the search feature above.  Note that I have almost zero additional information - it is all on the web site.  If you contact me, I will be polite but I don’t have any additional information. The best additional source of info for researchers is at the Cobourg Library where they have a local history room stocked with many historical books and documents. They do have some photos on-line but not much more - you need to visit.

A good source of information is the Northumberland County Archives. Contact the archivist Emily Cartlidge by email here or County Web site here.

The American Connection

Many early settlers in Cobourg were American and in fact, there were many wealthy Americans who came to Cobourg for the summer and this continued for most of the 19th century. Marsha Ann Tate of the Pennsylvania State University studied this.  She presented her findings to the Cobourg Historical Society and wrote a paper on the subject.

The summary is a copy of the powerpoint slides used for her presentation to the Society.

The first of four parts - The Establishment of the American Summer Colony - Cobourg was naturally endowed with the attributes of a virtual summer paradise

The Marketing of Cobourg as a Summer Destination - Shoenberger and Chambliss also launched a marketing campaign offering potential U.S. visitors to Cobourg a plethorea of pleasures in healthful surroundings.

Cobourg's Summer Visitors  - In addition to the Shoenberger family, a number of other wealthy individuals from the United States also began making Cobourg their summer home.

Social and Economic Linkages between Cobourg's Canadian and U.S. Residents - As the years passed, members of northern U.S. families who summered in Cobourg increasingly married colony members hailing from the southern United States.